Wahhabism A Critical Essay Hamid Algar Lectures

Hamid Algar
Average rating 3.83 · 462 ratings · 46 reviews · shelved 1,816 times



Showing 30 distinct works.


Occidentosis: A Plague from the West
byJalal Al-e Ahmad, Hamid Algar(Translation)
3.06 avg rating — 951 ratings — published 1962 — 15 editions
Social Justice in Islam
bySayed Qutb, Hamid Algar, John B. Hardie
3.92 avg rating — 486 ratings — published 1954 — 14 editions
Principles of Sufism
byAbd al-Karim al-Qushayri, B.R. Von Schlegell(Translator), Hamid Algar(Contributor)
4.20 avg rating — 279 ratings — published 1073 — 23 editions
The Perfect Guide to the Sciences of the Qur'an: Al-itqan Fi 'ulum Al-Qur'an
byجلال الدين السيوطي, Osman A. Al-Bili(Editor), Hamid Algar(Translator), Michael Schub(Translator)
4.26 avg rating — 101 ratings — published 2003 — 5 editions
Marxism and Other Western Fallacies : An Islamic Critique
byAli Shariati, Hamid Algar(Editor), R. Campbell(Translator)
4.01 avg rating — 92 ratings — published 1980 — 7 editions
On the Sociology of Islam: Lectures
byAli Shariati, Hamid Algar(Translator)
3.57 avg rating — 77 ratings — published 1979 — 4 editions
Wahhabism: A Critical Essay
byHamid Algar
3.44 avg rating — 77 ratings — published 2002 — 6 editions
Islam and Revolution I: Writings and Declarations of Imam Khomeini (1941-1980)
byRuhollah Moosavi Khomeini [روح الله خمينی], Hamid Algar(Translator)
4.05 avg rating — 61 ratings — published 1981 — 11 editions
Imam Abu Hamid Ghazali: An Exponent of Islam in Its Totality
byHamid Algar
4.50 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 2000 — 3 editions
The Supreme Sign: Observations Of A Traveller Questioning Creation Concerning His Maker
byBediüzzaman Said Nursî, Hamid Algar(Translator)
it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 1985 — 4 editions
Basic Principles of the Islamic Worldview
bySayed Qutb, Hamid Algar, Rami David
3.64 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 1995 — 8 editions
Roots of the Islamic Revolution in Iran
byHamid Algar
4.22 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 1983 — 6 editions
Principles of Islamic Jurisprudence: According to Shi'i Law
byArif Abdul Hussain, محمد باقر الصدر, Hamid Algar(Editor), Sa'eed Bahmanpour(Editor)
3.80 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 2004 — 5 editions
Fundamentals of Islamic Thought: God, Man, and the Universe
byMortaza Motahhari [مرتضی مطهری], Hamid Algar(Editor), R. Campbell(Translator)
3.70 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 1985 — 3 editions
Resurrection and the Hereafter: A Decisive Proof of Their Reality
byBediüzzaman Said Nursî, Hamid Algar(Translator)
4.11 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 2006 — 8 editions
Jami
byHamid Algar
3.18 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 2013
Religion and State in Iran, 1785-1906: The Role of the 'Ulama in the Qajar Period
byHamid Algar
3.71 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1969 — 3 editions

Works

Occasional Paper

Imam Khomeini: A Short Biography

Hamid Algar

Muharram 26, 14382016-10-27

A preliminary sketch, intended to acquaint the reader with the outlines of the Imam’s life and the main aspects of his person as an Islamic leader of exceptional stature. Imam Khomeini, A Short Biography By Hamid Algar Published by The Institute for Compilation and Publication of Imam Khomeini's Works (International Affairs Department).

1

Basic Principles of the Islamic Worldview

Sayyid Qutb

Sha'ban 04, 14242003-09-30

Sayyid Qutb, executed in 1966 by the Egyptian government but still broadly influential today, was deeply convinced that Islam provides an ideal framework for all of human existence -- individual and social, political and economic, intellectual and spiritual. He believed equally that in all these various aspects the religion had been obscured or distorted by an influx of alien influences. In this, one of this most widely read works, he addresses himself to the task of retrieving what he regards as the authentic mode of thought that is distinctive of Islam or even unique to it. This he does through the concise presentation of seven characteristics of Islamic thought, abundantly illustrated with citation of relevant Qur'anic verses. The translation has been edited and introduction by Hamid Algar, who places Sayyid Qutb and his work in his historical and contemporary context, and evaluates the ideas contained in the book.

1

Wahhabism - A Critical Essay

Hamid Algar

Dhu al-Hijjah 16, 14222002-03-01

Wahhabism, a peculiar interpretation of Islamic doctrine and practice that first arose in mid-eighteenth century Arabia, is sometimes regarded as simply an extreme or uncompromising form of Sunni Islam. This is incorrect, for at the very outset the movement was stigmatized as aberrant by the leading Sunni scholars of the day, because it rejected many of the traditional beliefs and practices of Sunni Islam and declared permissible warfare against all Muslims that disputed Wahhabi teachings. Nor can Wahhabism be regarded as a movement of “purification” or “renewal,” as the source of the genuinely revivalist movements that were underway at the time. Not until Saudi oil money was placed at the disposal of its propagandists did Wahhabism find an echo outside the Arabian Peninsula.

1
Occasional Paper

The Emergence of the 12th Imam [AS] at the end of time [Lecture 18]

Hamid Algar

Sha'ban 22, 14222001-11-08

Looking at the meaning of the greater occultation, the purpose that an occulted Imam [AS] may be said to fulfil. And certain peripheral modes of communication with the Imam [AS] even during the period of the greater occultation. With respect to the purpose of the Imam [AS], what purpose does he fulfil during the greater occultation? Two common metaphors are commonly adduced in explanation and justification of the greater occultation.

1
Occasional Paper

Post-Occultation Developments [Lecture 17]

Hamid Algar

Sha'ban 20, 14222001-11-06

Not surprisingly the greater occultation just like the lesser occultation precipitated a new crisis within the Shi’ah community, for an obvious reason that now very basic questions such as the utility - the very purpose of an Imam [AS] who is not simply inaccessible to the majority of his followers but no longer present on the physical plain, such basic questions came forward occasioning considerable doubt and hesitation both within and beyond the Shi’i community.

1
Occasional Paper

Al-Ghayba (Occultation) [Lecture 16]

Hamid Algar

Sha'ban 15, 14222001-11-01

When running through some of the different groups that existed among the Shi’ah after the death of the 11th Imam [AS] in the apparent absence of any physical offspring there were also the Qat’iyyah who stand at opposite extremes to the la adriyyah those people who contented themselves in saying we do not know what happened. The Qat’iyyah are those by contrast who are certain, Qat’iyyah meaning ‘those who profess certainty’.

1
Occasional Paper

Imam Hasan al-'Askari (a) and the birth of his son, the 12th Imam (a) [Lecture 15]

Hamid Algar

Sha'ban 13, 14222001-10-30

The 11th Imam [AS] had an offspring who after a relatively short period disappeared from the physical plain in what is called the occultation. Before considering the life and circumstances of the 11th Imam [AS] a few additional remarks can be made concerning the immediate background, the circumstances of the Shi’ah in general, the institution of the Imamate in particular in this period, the period of the 9th, 10th and 11th Imams [AS], the period leading up to the occultation.

1
Occasional Paper

Imam Muhammad al-Jawad al-Taqi (a) and Imam 'Ali al-Hadi (a) [Lecture 14]

Hamid Algar

Sha'ban 08, 14222001-10-25

The cult for respect for the twelve Imams [AS] of Shi’ism is seen to be compatible with a polemical hostility to Shi’ism itself on certain occasions and with certain personalities. As late as the 19th century, there is a sufi when he arrived in Mashhad on his way to Kurdistan from India he composed two poems one in honour of Imam Ali al-Rida [AS], and one in condemnation of the Shi’i ‘Ulema of Mashhad without seeing any contradiction between these two, a complex and interesting topic.

1
Occasional Paper

Imam 'Ali Ar-Rida (a) [Lecture 13]

Hamid Algar

Sha'ban 06, 14222001-10-23

The life and legacy of the 8th Imam – Imam Ali al-Rida [AS]. As was always the case, the death of the preceding Imam [AS] Imam Musa al-Kazim [AS] was accompanied with a degree of uncertainty and division within the community about the identity of the successor. On this occasion however the disagreement and confusion was relatively minor and short lived, almost the entirety of the Shi’i community came to accept Imam Ali al-Rida [AS] as the 8th Imam [AS] and as the successor to Imam Musa al-Kazim [AS].

1
Occasional Paper

Imam Musa al-Kadhim (a) [Lecture 12]

Hamid Algar

Sha'ban 01, 14222001-10-18

Taqiyyah – prudential dissimulation, means concealing one’s identity as a Shi’ah under conditions thought to be dangerous, either for the Imam [AS] himself, for the Shi’i community as a whole or for one’s own person. The utility of this practise one may say was demonstrated in the short run by the Imams after Imam Jaffer al-Sadiq [AS]. Their fragile and hazardous position was made tenable in part by the practise of taqiyyah. However a problem arises, the observance of taqiyyah by the Imams themselves means that not all of their recorded utterances are to be taken as expressing their true opinions.

1
Occasional Paper

Imam Ja'far As-Sadiq (a) Part II [Lecture 11]

Hamid Algar

Rajab 29, 14222001-10-16

Last time looked at Imam Jaffer al-Sadiq [AS] the sixth of the twelve Holy Imams [AS]. His accomplishments in general and then with particular regards to the development of Shi’ism. Broke off with the consideration of the doctrine of Nass – the insistence that each Imam [AS] must have been nominated by his predecessor – in a witnessed nomination and preferably set down in writing. This process was retrospectively claimed by Imam Jaffer al-Sadiq [AS] to have occurred with each of the Imams [AS], and if in the case of Imam Ali [AS] the First Imam [AS] this had not occurred then it is because of the denial of the request of the Prophet [sAW] on his deathbed that writing implements be brought forth in his presence. It may be assumed or it is assumed by Shi’i authors for him to dictate once again his intentions for Ali [AS] to succeed him as the Imam [AS].

1
Occasional Paper

Imam Ja'far as-Sadiq (a) [Lecture 10]

Hamid Algar

Rajab 24, 14222001-10-11

Imam Muhammad al-Baqir [AS] laid emphasis on the following factors – firstly his choice inherited from his father of political quietism, that is to say his refusal openly to contest rule by the Umayyads. And secondly as a corollary to that a growing emphasis upon the transmission of a unique body of knowledge as constituted the essence of the Imamate. Thirdly a clarification of specific details on which the emergent law of the Shi’ah community differentiated itself from the legal precepts of the surrounding Sunni Community, for example in the call to prayer the inclusion of ‘haya ‘ala khair al-‘aml’ ‘Hasten to the best of deeds’ included by Shi’ah Muslims but omitted by Sunni Muslims – it was Shi’ah belief that it was blocked by the second caliph ‘Umar.

1
Occasional Paper

Midterm review and Imam Muhammad Baqir (a) [Lecture 9]

Hamid Algar

Rajab 17, 14222001-10-04

The period in question is the period three caliphs and his abstention from public or political involvement, and his tenure as the fourth of the rightly guided caliphs (from the Sunni point of view). The obstacles that confronted him - you could talk about the existence of a rival centre of power in Damascus under the auspice of Mu’awiyah, who using the assassination of Uthman the third caliph as a pretext now wished to deny legitimacy to Imam Ali [AS] and refused him his loyalty and his obedience.

1
Occasional Paper

Long term effects of the events of Karbala, and Imam Zayn al-Abidin (a) [Lecture 8]

Hamid Algar

Rajab 15, 14222001-10-02

In the year 61 AH, 680 AD the martyrdom of Imam Husain [AS], grandson of the Prophet [sAW] and the third among the Imams [AS], took place. It was plain from the narrative elements that this was an extremely tragic event. In part it is the extremity of the atrocious death to which Imam Husain [AS], his companions and relatives were subjected that has anchored Karbala and the memory of Imam Husain [AS] in the Shi’i consciousness. Of course from one point of view it might be said that all of the Imams insofar as they had the quality of Imam are equal and no distinction is to be made among them, in the same way that the Quran tells us that an article of Islamic belief is not to make distinction among any of the messengers – to accept all of them with respect to their quality of Prophethood – not to affirm for one and deny for the other.

1
Occasional Paper

Imam Husayn (a) [Lecture 7]

Hamid Algar

Rajab 10, 14222001-09-27

Imam Husayn, the son of Imam Ali (a), was born on the 3rd of Sha'ban, 4AH (626 CE). Like his brother Hasan (a), the Imam was very close to his grandfather the Prophet (s), and resembled him in appeareance. His name was given to him by the Prophet, and is the dimunitive form of the Arabic 'Hasan'. The Prophet recited adhan in his ear at birth, and foretold the fated of the Imam at Karbala, calling him "Sayyid ash-Shuhada".

1
Occasional Paper

Legacy of Imam Ali (a) & Life of Imam Hasan (a) [Lecture 6]

Hamid Algar

Rajab 08, 14222001-09-25

After the Prophet [sAW] himself there is no other figure in Islamic History who has exercised the same comprehensive and lasting influence as Imam Ali [AS]. This can in part be seen from the duality of titles that one may be applied to him with respect to Sunni and Shi'ah tradition respectively. From the Sunni point of view he is the fourth among the rightly guided caliphs, from the Shi’ah point of view he is the first of he 12 Imams [AS], that in itself indicates that he holds an honoured position in the totality of Islamic tradition despite varying interpretations.

1
Occasional Paper

Imam 'Ali b. Abi Talib (a), Part II [Lecture 5]

Hamid Algar

Rajab 01, 14222001-09-18

The assumption of the caliphate by Imam Ali [AS] took place either on the same day Uthman was assassinated or according to another source some five days later. It would be useful in order to understand what transpires during the exercise of rule by Imam Ali [AS] to go back a little to examine the nature of the opposition to Uthman because many of the factors of political disunity that were operative during the caliphate of Uthman persisted into the caliphate of Imam Ali [AS].

1
Occasional Paper

Imam 'Ali b. Abi Talib (a), Part I [Lecture 4]

Hamid Algar

Jumada' al-Akhirah 25, 14222001-09-13

This is a look at that person that from the point of view of Shi’i Islam is the third from among the ma’sumin, the third of the presenters of the quality of inerrancy – ‘ismah which is shared by the Prophets and the Imams – Imam Ali bin Abi Talib [AS] the first of the Imams [AS]. Have spoken in the previous lecture looking at verses of the Quran which allude to him, also hadith of the Prophet [sAW] which indicate the special status of Ali [AS] as his successor, his successor as him [sAW] being the last of the Prophets. Today will look at his ascension, to power in the office of the caliphate.

1
Occasional Paper

Brief history of the Prophet (s) and his daughter Fatima (a), the confluence of two lights [LECTURE 3]

Hamid Algar

Jumada' al-Akhirah 23, 14222001-09-11

This lecture look at the Prophet [sAW], and his daughter Bibi Fatima [AS] who constitutes the link in between the Prophet [sAW] and the line of the Imams [AS]. Sometimes it has to be conceded that when an exposition is made of Shi’ism whether by it’s adherents or outsiders, inadequate attention is given to the person and the mission of the Prophet [sAW] only those intimate periods and aspects where the life of the Prophet [sAW] intersects decisively with the life of Imam Ali [AS] – only then is particular importance given to the Prophet [sAW]. However there is no doubt that the person and the accomplishment of the Prophet [sAW] is essential to the Shi’i historical consciousness as it is important to the consciousness of other Muslims.

1
Occasional Paper

Qur'an: The Foundational Document of Shi'i Islam [LECTURE 1]

Hamid Algar

Jumada' al-Akhirah 16, 14222001-09-04

Discussion of the importance of the Qur'an in Shi'ism, beginning with the use of the Hadith of Thaqalayn to show the special relationship between the Qur'an and the Ahlul Bayt. A general outline of beliefs about the Qur'an that are shared by all Islamic schools of thought follows, including the revelation, Divine and miraculous nature, preservation and purpose of the Qur'an. More specifically then, the Qur'an in Shi'ism is discussed, as is the role of the Prophet and the Imams as instructors in understanding the Qur'an. Also, a definition of Muhkam (firm) and Mutashabih (metaphorical) verses of the Qur'an, and the differences in Shi'i and Sunni beliefs in the interpretation of Mutashabih verses. Also includes an introduction to specific Qur'anic verses relevant to Shi'ism, beginning with verse 5:55.

1

Roots of The Islamic Revolution in Iran

Hamid Algar

Dhu al-Qa'dah 07, 14212001-02-01

All we need to do now is to note briefly that Imam Khomeini’s leadership has also overcome the multitude of internal and external enemies; that the ulama have emerged as the most competent leaders that any post-colonial country has produced; that the western educated ‘liberals’ and communists have been outwitted, outmaneuvered, and defeated; that the people of Iran are more united and mobilized today than at any time before; that the colonial culture and bourgeois capitalist, political, economic and social systems are being replaced; and that Iran has developed a new range of institutions all its own. The Islamic Revolution to which this book is an introduction has ushered the world into an era to which the modern world is unaccustomed. Politics in the world of Islam will never be dull again.

1

Social Justice in Islam

Sayyid Qutb

Ramadan 24, 14202000-01-01

"Social Justice in Islam" is perhaps the best known work of Sayyib Qutb, a leading figure in the Muslim Brethen of Egypt who was executed by the regime of 'Abd al-Nasr in 1966. Despite the years that have passed since Sayyid Qutb's death, the imprint of his thought on the contemporary Islamic movements of the Arab world remains profound. The Arabic original of "Social Justice in Islam" was first published in 1949, but this book in particular retains its relevance in many respects: the persistence of gross socio-economic inequality in most Muslim societies; the need for viewing Islam as a totality, imperatively demanding comprehensive implementation; and the depiction of the West as a neo-Crusading force.

1

Social and Historical Change: An Islamic Perspective

Murtaza Mutahhari

Ramadan 23, 14061986-06-01

There is a whole world of differences separated “Islamic revolution” from “revolutionary Islam”; the former expression means a comprehensive process of transformation that is conducted in accordance with Islam but does not exhaust the entire content of Islam, whereas the latter means an Islam reduced to being the instrument of revolution and defined completely in terms of socio-economic processes. Mutahhari was the most articulate defender of “Islamic revolution” against the encroachments of “revolutionary Islam.” The present book is in a sense a document of combat is confirmed by its abrupt ending; Mutahhari was assassinated before he was able to complete it. But the book should be read as more than a record of ideological struggles; it has lasting value as a statement of essential Islamic doctrine on the twin topics of society and history, and thus serves to complement perfectly the first volume of Mutahhari’s writings published by Mizan Press, Fundamentals of Islamic Thought.

1

Fundamentals of Islamic Thought: God, Man and the Universe

Murtaza Mutahhari

Ramadan 12, 14051985-12-01

Mutahhari's work is marked by a philosophical clarity that particularly qualifies him to deal with the fundamental problems of religious thought that form the subject of this book. The first essay, "Man and Faith," describes the distinctive characteristics of man as an order of creation and establishes his lasting need for both science and faith as complementary means of understanding the universe. Then comes an examination of a key concept of Islam, "The World-View of Tauhid," including some of its implications for the structure of the universe as well as for society and culture. The third essay deals with the nature of the Islamic philosophical tradition from which Mutahhari's thought is derived. The collection is completed by three shorter pieces in which Mutahhari demonstrates his awareness of Western as well as Islamic thought and offers fresh views on several fundamental issues religious concern.

1

Occidentosis: A Plague From the West

Jalal Al-i Ahmad

Ramadan 15, 14041984-06-15

Occidentosis is the best known and most influential work of the Iranian intellectual and writer, Jalal Al-i Ahmad. In a sense, it is the record of a personal journey to a new understanding of Iranian society and history, but since it aroused a widespread and enthusiastic response (to the degree that the coined word of its title permanently entered the Persian language), it may also be regarded as a document of the ideological ferment that ultimately led to revolution.To summarize, Gharbzadagi cannot be presented as a decisive and pioneering work of revolutionary thought, fully in tune with the historical forces that were to bring about revolution. Nonetheless, it has a solid if modest claim to lasting attention, as the record of an eloquent diagnosis of the major ill of Iranian society by one whose life was devoted to constant, sincere, and solicitous reflection on the state of his countrymen and who contributed to a partial reorientation of the Iranian intelligentsia.

1

Society and Economics in Islam: Writings and Declarations of Ayatullah Sayyid Mahmud Taleghani

Mahmud Taleghani

Rabi' al-Awwal 05, 14021982-01-01

It is the first anthology of Ayatullah Taleghani’s writings to appear in English. In fact, although some of his sermons have been translated into English elsewhere, this is the first publication in English of any portions of the writings for which he is most famous, Islam va Malikiyat (“Islam and Ownership”) and Partuvi az Qur'an (“ A Ray From the Qur’an). With its careful translation by Mr. R. Campbell, and Dr.Hamid Algar’s biographical introduction and extensive annotations, this volume is intended to serve as an authoritative introduction to the works of Ayatullah Taleghani for Muslim and non-Muslim alike. It is the core of Islam va Malikiyat that is presented here, 50 pages of the original; within the extract nothing at all has has been omitted. The commentaries on Surat al-Fatiha and Surat al-Infitar, from Partuvi az Qur’an, are also without any deletions. The remaining pieces, which form Sections II, III, and V, appear in their entirety.

1

Islam and Revolution: Writings and Declarations of Imam Khomeini (1941-1980)

Imam Khomeini

Rajab 28, 14011981-06-01

The present anthology is designed to serve as a detailed and reliable introduction to the ideas and pronouncements of Imam Khomeini for those who have no access to the original Persian texts. Imam Khomeini has been a prolific writer and frequent speaker, and this volume represents only a fraction of his total output. We have excluded writings that deal with technical aspects of Islamic jurisprudence and philosophy, although passing reference to such matters inevitably does occur in some of the texts we have translated. We begin with the best-known work of Imam Khomeini, his lectures on Islamic Government, and then proceed to offer a selection of his speeches and declarations, which, chronologically arranged, form an outline documentary history of the Islamic Revolution.

1
Occasional Paper

Imam Ruhullah al-Musavi al-Khomeini: An Introduction

Hamid Algar

Rabi' al-Awwal 19, 14011981-01-25

IMAM RUHULLAH AL-MUSAVI AL-KHOMEINI was born on September 24, 1902 into a family of strong religious traditions in Khumayn, a small town some hundred kilometers to the southwest of Tehran.1 Both his grandfather and father were religious scholars. The former, Sayyid Ahmad, was known as al-Hindi because of a period he had spent in India, where a distant branch of the family is said still to exist.

1
Occasional Paper

Islamic Government: Introduction

Imam Khomeini

Rabi' al-Awwal 19, 14011981-01-25

“Islamic Government” is an exact translation of the original Persian title, Hukumat-i Islami. However, the reader should bear in mind that the book does not purport to offer either a complete scheme of Islamic political philosophy or a detailed plan for the establishment and functioning of an Islamic state. Its purpose is narrower and more specific, and geared to the audience to whom the lectures were delivered: students of the religious sciences, who might be expected later to assume positions of influence in Muslim society.

1
Occasional Paper

The Necessity for Islamic Government

Imam Khomeini

Rabi' al-Awwal 19, 14011981-01-25

A BODY OF LAWS ALONE is not sufficient for a society to be reformed. In order for law to ensure the reform and happiness of man, there must be an executive power and an executor. For this reason, God Almighty, in addition to revealing a body of law (i.e., the ordinances of the shari’a), has laid down a particular form of government together with executive and administrative institutions.

1
Occasional Paper

The Form of Islamic Government

Imam Khomeini

Rabi' al-Awwal 19, 14011981-01-25

ISLAMIC GOVERNMENT does not correspond to any of the existing forms of government. For example, it is not a tyranny, where the head of state can deal arbitrarily with the property and lives of the people, making use of them as he wills, putting to death anyone he wishes, and enriching anyone he wishes by granting landed estates and distributing the property and holdings of the people.

1
Occasional Paper

Program for the Establishment of an Islamic Government

Imam Khomeini

Rabi' al-Awwal 19, 14011981-01-25

IT IS OUR DUTY TO WORK toward the establishment of an Islamic government. The first activity we must undertake in this respect is the propagation of our cause; that is how we must begin. It has always been that way, all over the world: a group of people came together, deliberated, made decisions, and then began to propagate their aims. Gradually the number of like-minded people would increase, until finally they became powerful enough to influence a great state or even to confront and overthrow it, as was the case with the downfall of Muhammad ‘Ali Mirza and the supplanting of his absolute monarchy with constitutional government.’

1
Occasional Paper

A Warning to the Nation

Imam Khomeini

Rabi' al-Awwal 19, 14011981-01-25

Neither a speech nor, strictly speaking, a declaration, this is an extract from Kashf al-Asrar, a book published by Imam Khomeini in 1941, soon after the forced abdication of Riza Shah. The book was written at the behest of Ayatullah Burujirdi in systematic refutation of an anti-religious tract that had appeared a few years earlier. Given its wide-ranging contents and those of the book it was designed to refute, as well as the currency of anti-religious literature in the period of Riza Shah, Kashf al-Asrar is largely political in nature and, in fact, constitutes his first public political statement.

1
Occasional Paper

In Commemoration of the Martyrs at Qum (April 3, 1963)

Imam Khomeini

Rabi' al-Awwal 19, 14011981-01-25

This declaration was given from Qum on the occasion of the fortieth day after the assault on Fayziya Madrasa that took place on March 22, 1963. Source: Khomeini va Junbish (a collection of speeches and declarations) (np., 1394/1974), pp. 1-3.

1
Occasional Paper

The Afternoon of ‘Ashura (June 3, 1963)

Imam Khomeini

Rabi' al-Awwal 19, 14011981-01-25

This speech, delivered at Fayziya Madrasa in Qum, is particularly notable for its fearless words of reproach addressed to the Shah. Source: Khomeini va Junbish, pp. 4-7.

1

Marxism and Other Western Fallacies

Ali Shariati

Jumada' al-Ula' 15, 14001980-04-01

In all the diverse speeches, lectures and writings of Shari’ati, there is barely a single reference to the political, economic and other miseries of Pahlavi Iran, and yet it is necessary now to designate him as the chief ideologue of the Iranian Islamic revolution. His lectures at the Husayniya-yi Irshad in Tehran and in other forums around the country awakened new interest and confidence in Islam, not merely as a private form of worship, but as a total world-view (jahanbini, one of the favorite terms), fully autonomous, superior to the creeds and ideologies of past and present, and bearing in its heart a revolutionary mission. A large number of the secularly educated intelligentsia who had become alienated from Islam – and thereby from their society and the masses of the Iranian nation-were drawn again to Islam as the pivotal point of both personal existence and national destiny by the eloquence, range and originality of Shari’ati’s thought.

1

Constitution of the Islamic Republic of Iran

Members of Assembly of Experts

Safar 13, 14001980-01-01

Constitutionalism has a long history in Iran. Interest in establishing a constitutional form of government, spurred partly by the influence of Western models and partly by developments in neighboring Turkey, first appeared in the last decade of the nineteenth century. The constitutional limitation of monarchical power was the principal goal of the revolutionary movement of 1905-1909. This movement, directed chiefly by the major religious leaders of the day, brought about the capitulation of Muzaffar ud-Din Shah in the summer of 1906, and the first Majlis in Iranian history prepared a constitution, consisting of a preamble and 51 articles, which was ratified on December 30, 1906. To it were added 107 supplementary articles, ratified on October 7, 1907. The constitution was amended four times, in accordance with the dictates of the Pahlavi family, in 1925, 1949, 1957, and 1967.

1
Occasional Paper

Man and Islam

Ali Shariati

Sha'ban 26, 13981978-08-01

(A translation of Islam va Islam a lecture given at the Petroleum College of Abadan. The introductory Paragraph has been omitted). THE QUESTION OF MAN is the most important of all ques­tions. The civilization of today is based upon humanism, the nobility of man and the worship of man. It is believed that the religions of the past crushed the personality of man and compelled him to sacrifice himself to the gods. They forced him to regard his own will as totally powerless when confronted by the will of God.

1

On the Sociology of Islam: Lectures by Ali Shariati

Ali Shariati

Sha'ban 01, 13981978-07-07

In preparing the way for the unparalleled surge of Islamic revival in Iran, many factors have been at work. One of the most important is the legacy of Dr. Ali Shari'ati (1933-1977). A teacher, scholar and writer, Shari'ati and a dynamic influence on the young people of Iran with his classes, discussions, free lectures and articles during the 1960's and 1970's. The book does not pretend to offer a complete scheme of Islamic sociology, nor did Shari'ati himself claim to have developed a complete scheme. With his original and courageous mind, he did, however, put forward a number of totally fresh concepts relating to the sociology of Islam, and it is these we have sought to present in English translation as a stimulus to thought among Muslims. The book contains a number of topics that are not, strictly speaking, sociological, but even they are treated in a sociological tone, so that the title of the book, on the Sociology of Islam, appears justified.

1
Occasional Paper

Ali Shariati - A Biographical Sketch

Gholamabbas Tavassoli

Rajab 25, 13981978-07-01

Everyone acquainted with Dr. Shari'ati knows well that not only is the study and reading of his works and thoughts instruc­tive and rewarding, but also his way and method of life were the reflection of a correct and profound vision of the world, a ray emitted by his faith. Here, we will set forth only an outline, a sketch, of a life that consisted entirely of work, activity, faith, love and responsibility‑the life of a conscious and dedicated man.

1
Occasional Paper

The World View of Tauhid

Ali Shariati

Rajab 25, 13981978-07-01

(Translated from Islamshinasi, Vol. pp.46 56.) MY WORLD‑VIEW CONSISTS OF tauhid. Tauhid in the sense of oneness of God is of course accepted by all monotheists. But tauhid as a world‑view in the sense I intend in my theory means regarding the whole universe as a unity, instead of dividing it into this world and the hereafter, the natural and the supernatural, substance and meaning, spirit and body. It means regarding the whole of existence as a single form, a single living and conscious organism, possessing will, intelligence, feeling and purpose.

1
Occasional Paper

Anthropology: The Creation of Man and the Contradiction of God and Iblis, or Spirit and Clay

Ali Shariati

Rajab 25, 13981978-07-01

(Transtaled from Islamshinsi, Vol. 1, pp. 56 68.) THE STORY OF ADAM and his creation in the Qur'an is the most profound and advanced expression of humanism that exists. In this story, Adam represents the whole human species, the essence of the human race, man in his philosophical sense, not in the biological sense. When the Qur'an speaks of man in the biological sense, it uses the language of the natural sciences, mentioning sperm, drops of clotted blood, fetus, etc.

1
Occasional Paper

The Philosophy of History: Cain and Abel

Ali Shariati

Rajab 25, 13981978-07-01

(Translated from Islamshinasi, Vol. I, pp. 68 85.) ACCORDING TO THE ISLAMIC school of thought, the philoso­phy of history is based on a certain kind of historical determinism. History represents an unbroken flow of events that, like man himself, is dominated by a dialectical contradic­tion, a constant warfare between two hostile and contradictory elements that began with the creation of humanity and has been waged at all places and at all times, and the sum total of which constitutes history.

1
Occasional Paper

The Dialectic of Sociology

Ali Shariati

Rajab 25, 13981978-07-01

(Translated from Islamshinasi, Vol. I, pp. 85 94.) SOCIOLOGY IS ALSO FOUNDED on a dialectic. Society, like history, is composed of two classes‑the class of Abel and the class of Cain‑for history is simply the movement of society along the line traced out by time. Society represents, therefore, a fragment corresponding to a certain time‑sector in history. If we remove the concept of time from the history of a people, we will be left with the society of that people.

1
Occasional Paper

The Ideal Society: the Umma

Ali Shariati

Rajab 25, 13981978-07-01

(Translated from Islamshinasi, Vol. 1, pp. 97 98.) THE IDEAL SOCIETY OF ISLAM is called the umma. Taking the place of all the similar concept‑, which in different languages and cultures designate a human agglomeration or society, such as "society," "nation," "race, “people,” “tribe," ”clan," etc., is the single word umma, a word imbued with progressive spirit and implying a dynamic, committed and ideological social vision.

1
Occasional Paper

The Ideal Man: The Viceregent of God

Ali Shariati

Rajab 25, 13981978-07-01

(Translated from Islamshinasi, Vol 1, pp. 98 104.) THE IDEAL MAN is the theomorphic man in whom the spirit of God has overcome the half of his being that relates to Iblis, to clay and to sediment. He has been freed from hesitation and the contradiction between the "two infinites." "Take on the characteristics of God"‑this is our whole philosophy of education, our sole standard!

1
Occasional Paper

The Fusion of the Gnostic and the Political in the Personality and Life of Imam Khomeini

Hamid Algar

Shawwal 22, 13891970-01-01

The integrality and comprehensiveness of the Imam's personality and vision of Islam are such that analytical distinctions among their various dimensions are in a sense artificial, reflecting an effort to understand the Imam rather than his actuality. It is nonetheless legitimate - or at least inevitable - to speak of the Gnostic ( ‘irfani) and political aspects of his life and activity and to accord a certain primacy to the former, in terms of not only chronology but also significance.

1

0 comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *